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Nigerian Scientist Develops Ventilators Using No Electricity

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Nigerian Scientist Develops Ventilators Using No Electricity

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Nigerian scientist, Yusuf Bilesanmi developed ventilators that doesn‘t require electricity.

The Lasu graduate, Yusuf Bilesanmi, who owns shifa technology, has won the Africa Prize for Engineering and developing an efficient and working ventilator and uses way less oxygen to carry out the same function as a regular ventilator.

READ ALSO: COVID-19: We converted our steel oxygen to medical oxygen to save lives – AFL

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FMoH/National AIDS and STI Control Programme (NASCP)

2021 World Hepatitis Day: Millions of Nigerians infected with Hepatitis – Minister

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2021 World Hepatitis Day: Millions of Nigerians infected with Hepatitis – Minister

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The Nigerian Minister of Health, Dr. Osagie Ehanire, says over 18. 2 million Nigerians are infected with viral hepatitis in the country.

READ ALSO: Over 124,000 Africans die annually from undiagnosed, untreated hepatitis– WHO

He said that awareness, reporting, diagnosis, and treatment of Hepatitis B and C remains low in Nigeria.

The Minister who was speaking in Abuja, said that Hepatitis remains a disease of public health importance and the mortality rate from both infections was still alarming, despite limited globally progress in addressing the scourge.

He stated that 16 million Nigerians were estimated to be infected with Hepatitis B and 2.2 million with Hepatitis C, which represents estimated prevalence rates of 8.1 percent and 1.1 percent respectively.

“In 2019, 3.8 percent of the world’s population was living with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus infection and 0.75 percent with ith Hepatitis C infection“, he added.

According to him, the 2021 theme aptly urges continuous effort to manage and mitigate hepatitis in Nigeria.

We adopted the national sub-theme “National Ownership and Financing for Viral Hepatitis Elimination”, as a clarion call to action by all stakeholders and acknowledge the need to increase engagement to realise the desired changes”, he said.

On efforts to tackle hepatitis, Ehanire said the ministry introduced policy documents and guidance for action with partner support, but regrets that ensuring optimal access to service remains a challenge, while out-of-pocket payment was still the main source for financing treatment.

“The government recognises the urgent need to address out-of-pocket payment, and improve sustainable financing, to be on course to the elimination targets”, he added.

In view of Nigeria’s commitment to the 2030 Viral Hepatitis Elimination plan, the minister said it was essential to improve community engagement, political leadership, testing and treatment, and scale up high-impact interventions.

He called on all Nigerians to work together to eliminate the “silent killer”, viral hepatitis by visiting a health facility to get screened.

The WHO, representative in Nigeria, Dr. Walter Mulombo, said that this year’s theme “hepatitis can’t wait”, emphasized the urgent need for countries to rapidly improve access to services to prevent, diagnose and treat viral hepatitis.

“In Africa including Nigeria, hepatitis is a silent epidemic: More than 90 million people are living with hepatitis in the Region, accounting for 26 percent of the global total.

“Around 4.5 million African children under five years old are infected with chronic hepatitis B, reflecting an enormous 70 percent of the global burden in this age group.

“The global target of less than 1 percent incidence of hepatitis B in children under 5 years has been reached, but the African Region is lagging at 2.5 percent,” Muombo disclosed.

He pledged commitment to continuing partnership with FMoH/National AIDS and STI Control Programme (NASCP), National Primary Health Care and Development Agency (NPHCDA), National Blood Transfusion Services (NBTS), National Harm Reduction Programme and other departments, partners and stakeholders working on Viral Hepatitis through provision of technical support, and innovations towards the attainment of the set targets.

The 2021 World Hepatitis Day theme is “Hepatitis Can’t Wait!”

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100 women undergo fistula operations in Borno

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100 women undergo fistula operations in Borno

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100 women with Vesico Vaginal Fistula (VVF), had successful operation as the North East Development Commission (NEDC) and the Borno State Government flagged off Free Fistula Repair Campaign Project (FFRCP) in Maiduguri yesterday.

READ ALSO: UNFPA treats over 38 VVF patients in Adamawa State

The wife of the Borno State Governor, Dr. Falmata Zulum, flagged off the ceremony at the Conference Hall, State Specialist Hospital in Maiduguri.

Zulum, who was represented by Commissioner for Health, Mrs. Juliana Bitrus, thanked the NEDC and other development partners for complimenting the efforts of the Borno State Government towards the provision of health care services to its people.

Bitrus said the women had their Fistula repairs in successful corrective surgeries at the State Specialist Hospital, Maiduguri at the flag-off flagged off a Free Fistula Repair Campaign Project in Maiduguri.

She stated, “This intervention is timely, as most women who are vulnerable due to activities of insurgency and the persistent poverty, which have caused a lot of women to fall victims to VVF, would benefit from the corrective surgery project.”

She appealed to the beneficiaries to stay away from sex in the next one year to enable them to have total healing.

The NEDC Board Chairman, Major General Paul Tarfa (retd.), who was represented by the Board member North-West zone, Hajiya Asmau Muhammadu said: “Statistics indicate that there are about 250,000 women awaiting repair in Nigeria, out of which only 3,000 are fortunate to be attended to annually.

“12,000 new cases develop every year with a large number coming from the North-East due to the insecurity and increased poverty, which further hindered access to health care.”

“It is, therefore, important that all efforts are made to bring succour to these vulnerable group of women to enable them to pick the pieces of their lives, by offering them a new lease for meaningful existence within their respective communities,” he stated.

Tarfa went on to note that it was unfortunate that women who experienced obstetric fistula suffer dejection from members of society.

Martha M/Punch

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Health

Kebbi  state Governor approves renovation of 36 PHC’s

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Kebbi  state Governor approves renovation of 36 PHC’s

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Kebbi state Governor, Abubakar Bagudu, has approved the renovation of 36 Primary Healthcare Centres across the state to improve health care delivery.

READ ALSO: Kebbi State Governor restates commitment to provision of basic amenities

This was announced by the Commissioner for Health, Jafar Muhammad he noted that the renovation of the 36 PHCs was under the auspices of the Saving One Million Lives Programme in the state towards achieving universal healthcare coverage for all.

Already, 134 PHCs have been revitalised towards improving quality of healthcare service at the grassroots level.

“The renovation of the 36 PHCs is going to improve healthcare services at the grass-roots level,”  he said.

Martha M/Punch

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Over 124,000 Africans die annually from undiagnosed, untreated hepatitis– WHO

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Over 124,000 Africans die annually from undiagnosed, untreated hepatitis– WHO

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The World Health Organisation (WHO) says over 124,000 Africans die every year from undiagnosed and untreated hepatitis.

READ ALSO: World Hepatitis Day: WHO calls for more awareness and testing

WHO Regional Director for Africa, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, said this in commemoration  of the World Hepatitis Day, aimed at increasing awareness about the disease under the theme: ‘Hepatitis can’t wait.’

Moeti said that the disease inflames the liver and can lead to liver cancer and cirrhosis, calling on all countries to rapidly improve access to services to prevent, diagnose and treat it.

She added that around 4.5 million African children, under five years, were infected with chronic hepatitis B, reflecting an enormous 70 per cent of the global burden in that age group.

Moeti said that the global target of less than 1 per cent incidence of hepatitis B in children under 5 years has been reached, but the African region was lagging behind at 2.5 per cent.

‌She said that most of such cases could be prevented by eliminating the Mother-To-Child Transmission (PMTCT) of the disease, during or shortly after birth and in early childhood.

Key interventions against hepatitis B include vaccination at birth and in early childhood, screening pregnant women, and providing timely treatment.

“Among people who are infected, nine out of 10 have never been tested, because of limited awareness and access to testing and treatment.

“Even among countries offering hepatitis B birth-dose vaccine, health systems are facing challenges in ensuring pregnant women and mothers are tested and that those who test positive are treated.

“At the same time, there are many promising developments on hepatitis. With the launch of the first global strategy on hepatitis in 2016, along with increased advocacy in recent years, political will is starting to translate into action.

“ Hepatitis medicines have also become much more affordable, with prices as low as $60 dollars per patient for a 12-week treatment, she said.

Moeti said that African heads of states had committed to addressing viral hepatitis as a public health threat in the Cairo Declaration in February 2020, and that the Egyptian Initiative planned to provide hepatitis C treatment for one million Africans, with South Sudan, Eritrea and Chad already reaching 50,000 people.

Apart from them, Rwanda, Uganda and Benin have established free testing and treatment programmes for hepatitis and 16 other countries are starting pilot projects in that direction.

“To guide action on hepatitis, 28 African countries now have strategic plans in place and at the global level WHO guidelines were launched in 2020 on prevention of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B,’’ Moeti said.

She added that the WHO Regional Office for Africa was developing training materials in order to help countries implement the five hepatitis core interventions and decentralize diagnosis and treatment.

Moeti, therefore, called on all stakeholders in maternal and child health to consider how hepatitis could be integrated into existing initiatives, because health systems play a vital role in preventing transmission by making sure blood donations were screened and syringes were used only once and then safely disposed of.

She also called on individuals to seek testing and treatment for hepatitis and to learn more about the disease to end the silent epidemic.

 

MTO/Punch

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Covid-19

Gombe test 256 NYSC officials, 300 corps members for Covid-19

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Gombe test 256 NYSC officials, 300 corps members for Covid-19

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256 NYSC officials managing activities at the Gombe State  Orientation Camp have been tested for COVID-19, while about 300 batch B Prospective Corps Members have already taken the COVID-19 test.

READ ALSO: NYSC deploys 50 health workers for medical support in Gombe

The Public Relations Officer and Head of Press, Gombe NYSC, Margaret Dakama, made this known, noting that the screening and registration exercise was going well.

According to the Gombe NYSC officials, none of those tested so far returned a positive COVID-19 result.

The three-week orientation exercise commenced on Tuesday in Amada, Akko Local Government Area in Gombe, and would last till August 16, 2021.

The expected number of prospective corps members in the camp is 1,750.

Dakama noted that the NYSC registration and screening process would continue till Friday. She however noted that “About 256 camp officials underwent the COVID 19 Rapid Diagnostic Test and 300 prospective Corps members.

The 300 corps members have been vaccinated. So far, no positive case. The registration will last till Friday 30th July, 2021,” Dakama noted.

Martha M/Punch

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